I Don't Do Cuddles

I Don't Do Cuddles

3,700.00

Improvised, monochromatic quilt with hand and machine quilting. Faux binding finished with paint.

cotton, silk, acrylic
63 x 61”
2018

“This quilt began with a stack of fabric I had folded into a neat little tower and placed in a corner of my studio. I thought they looked so harmonious together. Like friends. Before the quilt’s conception I had done some research on Amish quilts and certain elements traditional of those quilts can be found in my design: flying geese, sawtooth patterns, checkered blocks. 

During the piecing and quilting, its warm colors made me feel uneasy. What started as a harmonious stack of cloth was now a restless and defiant design. Some blocks are machine quilted, others are done by hand. The side by side comparison of manipulation intrigues me. What do the materials gain, or loose within each approach?

The “binding” was perhaps a way for me to tame and contain its contents. But in a flame, blue is the hottest color. It’s a painted-on binding that leaves the quilt’s inner layers exposed, and its private, raw parts—which should have no place in a finished quilt—vulnerable.”

Lorena Marañon

This quilt was part of the third annual group show, Piecework Collective, in conjunction with NYC Textile week, September 2018.

  • Includes hanging and caring instructions.

  • Free shipping within the United States.

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This quilt began with a stack of fabric I had folded into a neat little tower and placed in a corner of my studio. I thought they looked so harmonious together. Like friends. Before the quilt’s conception I had done some research on Amish quilts and certain elements traditional of those quilts can be found in my design: flying geese, sawtooth patterns, checkered blocks. 

During the piecing and quilting, its warm colors made me feel uneasy. What started as a harmonious stack of cloth was now a restless and defiant design. But I was defiant myself in choosing not to add complementary colors. Some blocks are machine quilted, others are done by hand. The side by side comparison of manipulation intrigues me. What do the materials gain, or loose with each approach?

The “binding” was perhaps a way for me to tame and contain its contents. But in a way it may have made it worse. In a flame, blue is the hottest color. It’s a painted-on binding that leaves the quilt’s inner layers exposed, and its private, raw parts—which should have no place in a finished quilt—vulnerable. 

The quilt spoke to me afterward and said “You can have me, but you can’t handle, or use me. My edges are delicate, yet they are also rough. I’m soft, but even if I could comfort you, I wouldn’t want to.” Certain elements within it reflect me more than others. I can’t possibly know everything it’s saying about me. But I do believe every piece I make is a self-portrait.